Tag Archives: MEDIEVAL

CARVING

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As I cooked the Thanksgiving feast, I got to perform a task that I wanted to do: carving the turkey. The reason why I wanted to do this task was that it would provide more inspiration for my next fantasy books. In medieval times, the job of master carver was a great honor in a monarch’s court and there would be ways to carve different animals. While carving, you would follow the actual structure of the animal and the knife should be an extension of the arm. Thinness is important because if you carved the meat too thickly it would result in the lord or monarch’s teeth disintegrating and the carver would be a very unpopular individual. It was a good sensational experience as I worked my way through the skin, meat, and bones of the turkey. My family enjoyed my handiwork and I look forward to next year.

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MEDIEVAL WAFERS

http://medievalcookery.com/recipes/wafers.html

I found yet another medieval recipe to try for my next fantasy book, sugar wafers. Wafers were the precursors of waffles and were smaller. Waffle cones for ice cream are closer to the medieval wafers. In medieval kitchens, there was a station called a wafery where an officer called a waferer spent all his time making wafers. Even though wafers took about two minutes to make, they were so precious to both royalty and nobility that they were kept under lock and key. They were a delicacy that was reserved only for the king and his favorite servants and courtiers. This is definitely a food that would be eaten by kings and emperors in Gradaia. In fact, I gave them an appearance during a coronation feast, but had to guess what they tasted like. Now with this recipe I will be able to get a more authentic idea of how they smelled and tasted.

I GOT CHAINMAIL

Photo on 11-5-17 at 12.53 AM

Here is a little costume I will be wearing at my book signing on the 12th. It is a chainmail coif, which is what medieval knights and men-at-arms wear under their helmets. It is a lot heavier than it looks and the links pinch my skin and snag my hair. I have started to write while wearing this thing and I am writing a lot more prolifically with it on. It is as though I am getting in character while writing.

FALCHION

Falchion

This is a type of sword I included in Numen the Slayer, a falchion. A falchion is a type of single-edged sword that operates like a machete and can only be wielded one-handed. It is one of the weapons of choice of King Robar Baal and has a blade forged from a meteorite called a Ferruman. King Robar uses this in conjunction with a meat cleaver that has a handle made from human bone. These weapons make King Robar a frightening enemy on the battlefield.

BATTLE OF PILLETH

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One of my favorite battles in medieval history would be the Battle of Pilleth during the Welsh Revolt of 1402. It pitted the Welsh rebel Owain Glyndwr and his 1,500 men against Sir Edmund Mortimer and his 2,000 men. Mortimer had Glyndwr outnumbered by 500 men and the Welsh only specialized in guerilla warfare instead of open warfare. Although a risky tactic, Glyndwr divided his army in half with 750 men on top of the hill and the other 750 men hidden in a valley on the other side of the hill. Meanwhile, Mortimer’s much larger army was marching towards the 750 men on the hill. The hill was very steep and Mortimer’s men were exhausted from carrying heavy armor and weapons up as they marched. Once the two hosts were in position, they fired on one another with arrow fire. Due to the steepness of the hill, the Welsh archers fired their arrows further downhill than the English could fire their arrows uphill. As a result, the English were taking all the casualties and the Welsh were untouched. With none of his arrows reaching the enemy and his men dying left and right, Mortimer changed tactics and attempted to take the fight to Glyndwr. However, because the battle was turning out so badly for the English, the archers on the left flank of Mortimer’s army mutinied and started firing arrows at their former allies at point blank range. Some say these archers were double agents Glyndwr infiltrated into Mortimer’s army while others believe that they switched sides when they thought Glyndwr would win. Either way, this unexpected treachery disrupted the integrity of Mortimer’s host. Glyndwr saw his chance and charged at the English from on top of the hill. As the battle progressed, the archers switched their longbows for daggers so they could finish wounded enemies off. When Mortimer was on the verge of defeat, the other half of Glyndwr’s army emerged from the valley on the other side of the hill and ambushed them from the right flank and rear. This resulted in the Welsh’s first victory in open warfare against the English. For the second volume of my fantasy series, I am thinking of combining elements from this battle with the Battle of Towton in a major battle.