A WORLD WITHOUT RELIGION

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In some of the darkest dystopian stories I have been exposed to, there is always an integral part of human nature and culture that was being stripped away. For example, in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, possessing books were banned and any books that were found were promptly burned. Another example is the Christian Bale film Equilibrium, which involved banning human emotion and any items that would stir human emotion. In Equilibrium, feeling emotions and possessing unauthorized items were capital offenses punishable by death. In my superhuman series, I am considering raising the stakes by creating a world where religion was banned. Religion would still be used for creative and educational purposes, but actually believing and worshipping it would be capital offenses. This would be fitting since this world will be run by a totalitarian regime. I got the idea from things I heard on the recent news of people being persecuted for their beliefs and I wondered what would happen if that persecution persisted in the distant future. I can imagine it being a dark and cynical time ruled by dark and cynical people, which in my opinion would make a great dystopian landscape. One of my main characters and their family will secretly religious until their secret is leaked to the government and all hell breaks loose. This will serve as an integral part of this character’s origin story. Tell me what you think of this scenario.

2 thoughts on “A WORLD WITHOUT RELIGION”

  1. I have a similar idea for a dystopian novel, but religion isn’t banned, just controlled and censored. It’s a concept I have wondered about, too. I see so many people say that the world would be a better place without religion. Ironically, some of the people who say this are some of the same people that espouse the beauty of accepting peoples differences. It’s counterproductive to their cause to say to accept people as they are and then to want to ban religion. Allowing different religious viewpoints of different faiths is a keystone of the mark of truly accepting and celebrating differences.

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